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Measuring the success of a slow-paced art with Annemieke Boots.

Annemieke learned the principles of making ceramics seven years ago from a Swedish potter. While she browsed through his studio in a small harbour town in the south west of Sweden, she casually conversed with him while he worked at his throwing wheel and was mesmerized by the magic of throwing.

“Maybe he saw a twinkle in my eyes, I don’t know, but he asked if I wished to learn throwing, and so I answered well yes, why not?”

So a week later she sat at his wheel, feeling a lump of wet clay in her hands and was deeply touched, and it was at that moment she knew what she wished to do in life. The goosebumps and tears in her eyes made it clear. This is how it all began; she bought a small wheel and spent many hours to feel, try, and throw the clay.

“I was wondering if I should learn it at an art school, but the Swedish potter advised me not to do this. He said you will learn, will find your way, take a workshop here and there and just throw.”

Learning as she went, Annemieke developed a personal style by following her heart and hands. As a self-proclaimed “very visual person,” she’s able to measure and record shapes, colours, and tones everywhere.

“I get inspired by many things, like nature, books about art and homes, magazines, and I notice shapes and textures everywhere. Apparently this transforms slowly in my mind and settles in my heart. And then, when I have time to create something new, I let my hands do the work.”

Step by step, her ceramics business developed organically. She tells us to be a potter and to make a small living of this, you need to have a dream and a vision. She’s a strong believer that a lot of finding a calling is because of timing, and the universe connecting with your energy; the right things coming at the right time.

AB Ceramics feature for Merrymen Magazine

But she says balance is a key part also by being conscious and mindful where you want to go and hope to achieve in life. Perhaps a reason why Annemieke is so enthralled by pottery is that she creates every piece from the heart and loves that a piece can be useful or simply a pleasure to look at.

Her goal to connect with clients by being personal and authentic is an important part of her manifesto, so she can truly get to know for whom she creates. Being that the entire process of making a piece is quite long, she feels that by meeting and getting to know the person she can create pieces inline with their energy.

“I hope my tableware, or maybe pieces of art can give extra value to those small moments of happiness when you are connected with yourself and others.”

The idea is that when her clients are enjoying moments or when sharing food with friends on plates and bowls she’s made, that the food and ceramics connect to people’s emotions.

However, the success of running a business and being an artist comes with its’ challenges and Annemieke explains that it is often difficult to commit to the amount of time that is needed to constantly create and produce. Therefore, it’s next to impossible, for her, to get paid for every hour spent.

“You have to be an artist, a manager, a marketer and take care of all the finances at the same time.”

What’s next for Annemieke Boots Ceramics? She knows herself well enough to create a sense of balance after busy times. Her aim is to work at a slower pace, to take less commissions, and to develop her skills while creating new work.

Her advice to creatives: “I believe successful artists have a dream, have a goal and they just make it happen.”

Measuring the success of a slow-paced art with Annemieke Boots.

Annemieke learned the principles of making ceramics seven years ago from a Swedish potter. While she browsed through his studio in a small harbour town in the south west of Sweden, she casually conversed with him while he worked at his throwing wheel and was mesmerized by the magic of throwing.

Arts & Culture | Vol.5

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